Night Hunting Laws - Pointoptics

Night Hunting Laws by State

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Please note:

This guide deals with night hunting laws relating to furbearers and non-game animals only. Almost all 50 states prohibit night hunting of game animals (deer, turkey, elk, moose, small game, etc.).

We’ve classified each state regulation as either “allowed” or “not allowed”. Please check each individual state for specific species, caliber, season, and county restrictions as every state has its own set of regulations and restrictions.

While the information provided below was verified with the various State Law Enforcement agencies at the time of publication, this article merely serves as a guideline. State Laws and regulations are subject to change and, while we try our best to keep our information up-to-date, all official state websites or information supersedes any information provided below. For each state’s regulation, we have also included a link to download their regulation booklet for further reading.

Alabama

FOX, RACCOON, AND OPPOSSUM:

May be hunted daytime and nighttime hours. No running of dogs during daytime or after 3:00 A.M. during and in areas of spring turkey. Check with USFS for further restrictions.

ALLIGATOR:

By Special Limited Quota Permit Only. Must register online at www.outdooralabama.com between June 4 (8:00 a.m.) and July 10 (8:00 a.m.). Must be a resident or lifetime hunting license holder to register.

BULLFROG AND PIG FROG:

Limit 20 frogs in aggregate per person from 12 Noon to 12 Noon the following day

“It shall be unlawful to possess any equipment that uses electronics to increase the ability to see in the dark (night vision equipment) while hunting any species of wildlife, both protected or unprotected species.”

Fox may be hunted during night-time hours with light and dogs only, and raccoon and opossum may be hunted during nighttime hours with the use of a light and legal arms and ammunition as provided in rule 220-2-.02 when hunter or hunters are accompanied by dog or dogs free of the leash.

In Short:

Only night hunting of foxes, raccoons, opossums, alligators, bullfrogs and pig frogs are allowed. No hunting with night vision equipment is permitted. Foxes may be hunted during nighttime hours with artificial light and dogs only, and raccoons and opossums may be hunted during nighttime hours with the use of artificial light and legal arms and ammunition as provided in rule 220-2-.02 when the hunter is accompanied by a dog or dogs free of the leash.

» Download the Regulations

Marisa Futral
marisa.futral@dcnr.alabama.gov
 334-242-3469
www.outdooralabama.com

Updated: 01/29/2020

Alaska

“If you want to take marmot, marten, mink, muskrat, river otter, or weasel, you must buy a trapping license and follow trapping regulations.

You may take beaver, coyote, fox, lynx, squirrel, wolf, or wolverine under either a hunting license or a trapping license, but you must follow the seasons, bag limits, and methods and means permitted by that license.

In Unit 18, lead shot size T (.20” diameter) or smaller is prohibited. Taking game under provisions of either a hunting or trapping license using a shotgun or using loose shot in a muzzleloading firearm is ONLY ALLOWED using nontoxic shot size T (.20” diameter) or smaller, and hunters may not be in immediate possession of lead shot.

Portions of Units 20, 24, 25, and 26 are within the Dalton Highway Corridor Management Area (DHCMA) and additional restrictions apply. See page 114. Fur Animals

Fur animals MAY NOT be taken under the hunting regulations by the following methods:

  • with a dog (except coyote in Unit 20D), trap, snare, net, or fish trap;
  • by disturbing or destroying dens;
  • the same day you have been airborne, unless you are at least 300 feet from the airplane;
  • with a nonresident small game license.”

“You may not take furbearers with the aid of a pit, fire, light (other than sunlight or moonlight), laser sight (excluding rangefinders), electronically-enhanced night vision, any forward looking infrared device, any device that has been airborne, controlled remotely, or communicates wirelessly, and used to spot or locate game with the use of a camera or video device, any camera or other sensory device that can send messages through wireless communication, artificial salt lick, explosives, expanding gas arrow, bomb, smoke, deer urine, elk urine, chemical (excluding scent lures), or a conventional steel trap with an inside jaw spread over 9 inches. Exceptions: Killer-style (body-grip) trap with a jaw spread of less than 13 inches may be used. Artificial light may be used for the purpose of taking furbearers Nov 1- Mar 31 in Units 7 and 9-26 during an open season.”

“You may not take furbearers with the aid of a pit, fire, light (other than sunlight or moonlight), laser sight (excluding rangefinders),”

In Short:

Night hunting is allowed, provided you have the necessary hunting and/or trapping license. There are season, bag limit, hunting methods and means restrictions applied to the license. The use of night vision equipment and artificial light is not allowed.

» Download the Regulations

Will Newberry
dfg.dwc.infocenter@alaska.gov
 907-267-2347
www.adfg.state.ak.us

Updated: 01/29/2020

Arizona

“A person may take predatory and fur-bearing animals by using the following methods, when authorized by Commission Order and subject to the restrictions under R12-4-303 and R12-4-318:
1. Firearms;

A person may take nongame mammals and birds by any method authorized by Commission Order and not prohibited under R12-4-303, R12-4-318, and R12-4-422, subject to the following restrictions. A person:
3. Shall not use firearms at night;

A person may take reptiles by any method not prohibited under R12-4-303 or R12-4-318 subject to the following restrictions. A person:
2. Shall not use firearms at night.”

“Per R12-4-304, an individual shall not use or possess any electronic night vision equipment, electronically enhanced light-gathering devices, thermal imaging devices or laser sights while taking wildlife: except for devices such as laser range finders, scopes with self-illuminating reticles, and fiber optic sights with self-illuminating sights or pins that do not project a visible light onto an animal.“

“A person may take predatory and fur-bearing animals by using the following methods, when authorized by Commission Order and subject to the restrictions under R12-4-303 and R12-4-318:

Raccoon:
Artificial light while taking raccoon provided the light is not attached to or operated from a motor vehicle, motorized watercraft, watercraft under sail, or floating object towed by a motorized watercraft or a watercraft under sail;

Coyote:
Artificial light while taking coyote during seasons with day-long hours, provided the light is not attached to or operated from a motor vehicle, motorized watercraft, watercraft under sail, or floating object towed by a motorized watercraft or a watercraft under sail.

Nongame Mammals and Birds:
A person may use artificial light while taking nongame mammals and birds, if the light is not attached to or operated from a motor vehicle, motorized watercraft, watercraft under sail, or floating object towed by a motorized watercraft or a watercraft under sail.”

Reptiles:
A Person may use artificial light while taking reptiles provided the light is not attached to or operated from a motor vehicle, motorized watercraft, watercraft under sail, or floating object towed by a motorized watercraft or a watercraft under sail.

In Short:

Coyote and raccoon night hunting allowed. Nongame mammals and birds, as well as reptiles, may be hunted at night, but the use of firearms at night is prohibited.

» Download the Regulations

T Wozniak
twozniak@azgfd.gov
 602-942-3000
www.azgfd.gov

Updated: 01/29/2020

Arkansas

It is unlawful to hunt any wildlife at night, except for:

The taking of bobcat, raccoon, and opossum when treed by dogs at night during an open season for that species (Addenda A1.05, C1.09).

The taking of aquatic wildlife other than mussels by legal methods during an open season.

The taking of bullfrogs by legal methods during an open season.

The taking of alligators by legal methods during an open season in compliance with Addendum A1.10 and Code 12.03.

“Allowed for hunting feral hogs. Raccoons may be hunted at night with the aid of night vision if dogs are being used. All other instances are not allowed.”

“It is unlawful to shine artificial lights from any public road, or on any wildlife management area, for viewing or locating wildlife. Except for:

The taking of bullfrogs and furbearers by legal methods during an open season.

The taking of alligators by legal methods during an open season in compliance with Addendum A1.10 and Code 12.03.”

In Short:

Night hunting only allowed for bobcats, opossums, and raccoons when treed by dogs. Alligator and bullfrog night hunting is allowed. The use of night vision is allowed only when hunting feral hogs and raccoons. Using artificial light may be used.

» Download the Regulations

Joe Huggins
joe.huggins@agfc.ar.gov
 501-223-6300
www.agfc.com

Updated: 02/13/2020

California

Notwithstanding any other provisions of these regulations, hunting wildlife from one-half hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise is prohibited in Monterey and San Benito counties east of Highway 101. 

“(c) It is unlawful to use or possess night vision equipment to assist in the taking of a bird, mammal, amphibian, reptile, or fish. For purposes of this subdivision, “night vision equipment” includes, but is not limited to, the following:

(1) An infrared or similar light, used in connection with an electronic viewing device.

(2) An optical device, including, but not limited to, binoculars or a scope, that uses electrical or battery-powered light amplifying circuits.

CCR T14-264. Use of Lights While Hunting— Specific Areas.

(a) Lights of any size or voltage may be used to take fur-bearing or nongame mammals only in the areas described in subsections (b) and (c) below, and only under the following conditions:

(1) The use of lights for night hunting is prohibited in any area where the general deer season is open.

(2) Furbearing mammals and nongame mammals may be taken with the aid of a spotlight or other artificial light operated from a vehicle provided such vehicle is stopped and standing with the motor off. No spotlight may be used from a vehicle which is on a public road or highway .”

In Short:

Night hunting is allowed, except for Monerey and Sanbenito countries east of Highway 101. Night vision equipment may not be used at all, and the use of an artificial light is allowed with certain restrictions.

» Download the Regulations

Kirsten Macintyre
kirsten.macintyre@wildlife.ca.gov
 916-653-7203
www.dfg.ca.gov

Updated: 01/29/2020

Colorado

“Raccoons, coyotes, bobcats, striped skunks, beavers, and red, gray or swift foxes can be hunted at night.”

“EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVES, EUROPEAN STARLINGS AND HOUSE (ENGLISH) SPARROWS are considered invasive species in Colorado. Because of this designation, these species may be hunted year-round. No license or Habitat Stamp is required to hunt invasive species; however hunters must have and carry with them a hunter education card. Hunters may harvest any number of each of these species and by any method of take approved for big- or small-game hunting. These species may be taken at night with the use of artificial light and night vision equipment “

“On private land, artificial light is allowed at night to hunt beavers, raccoons, coyotes, bobcats, striped skunks and red, gray or swift foxes, with permission of landowner or agent.

On public land, artificial light is allowed at night with permit from local district or area wildlife manager, to hunt raccoons, coyotes, bobcats, striped skunks, beavers and red, gray or swift foxes. Permits are valid for time and place specified.

It is illegal to hunt with a light permanently attached to a vehicle, or to project light from inside a vehicle.”

In Short:

Raccoons, coyotes, bobcats, striped skunks, beavers, and red, gray or swift foxes can be hunted at night. Eurasian Collared-Doves, European Starlings, and House Sparrows can also be hunted at night. The use of night vision equipment and artificial light is allowed with the necessary permits.

» Download the Regulations

Bradley Gabrielski
bradley.gabrielski@state.co.us
 303-297-1192
www.cpw.state.co.us

Updated: 02/10/2020

Connecticut

Hunting Hours: No restrictions on state-owned lands open to hunting and on private lands where landowners have given permission.

Legal Firearms: When hunting at night, rifles or handguns using ammunition larger than .22 caliber rimfire or shotgun shells larger than #2 shot may not be used.

Yale Forest Permit-Required Area:

Night hunting and harvest of coyotes and foxes prohibited.”

“Night vision use is legal”

“It is illegal to take raccoons or opossums with the use of a light from a motor vehicle.”

In Short:

Raccoon and opossum hunting is allowed, but caliber restrictions apply. The use of night vision equipment and artificial light is allowed, but can not use light from a motor vehicle.

» Download the Regulations

deep.wildlife@ct.gov
 860-424-3011
www.cpw.state.co.us

Updated: 02/05/2020

Delaware

“It is unlawful to:

Hunt at night (1/2 hour after sunset to 1/2 hour before sunrise) except that frogs, raccoons and opossum may be hunted at night using a handheld light.

“It is unlawful to:

Use night vision or infrared devices while hunting.”

“It is unlawful to:

Hunt at night (1/2 hour after sunset to 1/2 hour before sunrise)
except that frogs, raccoons and opossum may be hunted at night
using a handheld light.

In Short:

Frogs, raccoons, and opossum may be hunted at night using a handheld light. The use of night vision equipment is prohibited, as well as any other forms of artificial light.

» Download the Regulations

Robert Brennan
robertb.brennan@delaware.gov
 302-739-5297
www.dnrec.state.de.us

Updated: 01/29/2020

Florida

Hunting raccoons or opossums at night is allowed, but only .22-caliber rimfire firearms (other than .22-magnums) or single-shot .410-gauge shotguns (using shot not larger than size 6) may be used.

On private property with landowner permission, wild hogs may be hunted year-round day or night without restriction (i.e., by all lawful methods with no bag/possession limits, no size limits and no licenses/permits required)

“Night vision equipment may be used provided that the night vision device does not emit visible light (IR light is allowed)”

Hunting raccoons or opossums by displaying or using lights from moving vehicles, vessels or animals is prohibited.

In Short:

Hunting raccoons or opossums at night is allowed, but caliber restrictions apply. The use of artificial light is not allowed, while night vision equipment is allowed provided that it does not emit any visible light.

» Download the Regulations

Justin Wallheiser
fwc@mycusthelp.net
 850-488-8573
www.myfwc.com

Updated: 02/05/2020

Georgia

“Legal hours for hunting are 30 minutes before sunrise until 30 minutes after sunset, except alligators, raccoons, opossums, foxes, coyotes, bobcats and feral hogs which may be hunted at night.

“Any light used to hunt raccoons, opossums, foxes, bobcats must be carried on the body of the hunter, affixed to a helmet or hat worn by the hunter, or be part of a belt system worn by the hunter. There is no voltage restriction on such lights.”

“Any light used to hunt raccoons, opossums, foxes, bobcats must be carried on the body of the hunter, affixed to a helmet or hat worn by the hunter, or be part of a belt system worn by the hunter. There is no voltage restriction on such lights.”

In Short:

Alligators, raccoons, opossums, foxes, coyotes, bobcats, and feral hogs may be hunted at night. The use of artificial light and night vision equipment is also allowed, but restrictions apply.

» Download the Regulations

Jennifer Pittman
jennifer.pittman@gadnr.org
 770-918-6416
www.gohuntgeorgia.com

Updated: 02/06/2020

Hawaii

“No person shall hunt from one-half hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise except where specified differently”

“Any light used to hunt raccoons, opossums, foxes, bobcats must be carried on the body of the hunter, affixed to a helmet or hat worn by the hunter, or be part of a belt system worn by the hunter. There is no voltage restriction on such lights.”

“No person shall hunt game mammals with the use of artificial light.

In Short:

Night hunting in the state of Hawaii is not allowed, and therefore any use of night vision equipment and artificial light is not allowed.

» Download the Regulations

Marlene Hiraoka
marlene.m.hiraoka@hawaii.gov
 808-973-9787
www.hawaii.gov

Updated: 01/30/2020

Idaho

“Some animals are classified as “predators” or as “unprotected” and can be hunted and taken all year. Animals classified as predators in Idaho include coyotes, raccoons, jackrabbits, skunks, weasels, and starling. The most frequently hunted unprotected animals include marmots, fox squirrels, porcupines, opossum and Columbian ground squirrels, English sparrows, Eurasian-collared doves, and feral pigeons. These species may be taken in any amounts and at any time by holders of the appropriate valid Idaho hunting, trapping or combination hunting license, provided such taking is not in violation of state, county, or city laws, ordinances or regulations.

Night vision is allowed only for coyotes and raccoons at night, provided that the necessary permission and spotlight permit is obtained.”

“It Is unlawful to hunt any animal or bird by aid of a spotlight, flashlight or artificial light of any kind; except unprotected or predatory animals on private land after obtaining written permission, and on public lands after obtaining the required permit from a Fish and Game regional office. It is lawful to hunt raccoons on public lands without a permit if such taking is not in violation of state, county, or city laws, ordinances, or regulations.

“No person may hunt any furbearing animal with or by the aid of artificial light”

In Short:

Animals classified as predators or as unprotected species may be hunted at night. Predatory animals include coyotes, raccoons, jackrabbits, skunks, weasels, and starling. Unprotected species include marmots, fox squirrels, porcupines, opossum, Columbian ground squirrels, English sparrows, Eurasian-collared doves, and feral pigeons. These animals may be hunted with the use of artificial light but do require a permit. Night vision is only allowed for coyotes and raccoons, but also require a permit.

» Download the Regulations

licenses@idfg.idaho.gov
 800-554-8685
www.fishandgame.idaho.gov

Updated: 01/29/2020

Illinois

Raccoon, opossum, fox (red and gray), and bobcat hours:

“Open 24 hours and season begins 1/2 hour before sunrise on 10 Nov 2019 and closes 1/2 hour after sunset 15 Feb 2020. *see archery restrictions

“Must possess a Bobcat Hunting and Trapping Permit BEFORE attempting to harvest a bobcat. Limit one bobcat per person per season. Must purchase Bobcat Registration Permit within 48 hours of harvesting a bobcat. Taking bobcats in closed zone is prohibited.”

Coyote and striped skunk hours:

“1/2 hour before sunrise to 1/2 hour after sunset. No time restriction 10 Nov 2019– 15 Mar 2020”

“Illinois does not restrict the type of sights or scopes used for coyote hunting (including laser sights and night vision scopes).”

“You cannot legally use lights of, any light from, or any light connected to a vehicle or conveyance in areas where wildlife can be found. This does not prohibit normal use of headlamps for driving upon a roadway. Except: skunk, opossum, red or gray fox, coyote and raccoon may be harvested during the open season using a small handoperated light by a person who is on foot and not in any vehicle.”

“Lights with any color of lens can be used while hunting coyotes as long as the lights are not used from or connected to any vehicle or conveyance (including ATVs and horses).”

In Short:

Night hunting of Raccoon, opossum, fox (red and gray), bobcat, coyote, and striped skunk is allowed during the specified season. Permits and restrictions apply. Night vision equipment and the use of artificial light is also allowed, within specified guidelines.

» Download the Regulations

Stuart Fraser
Stuart.Fraser@Illinois.gov
 217-782-7305
www2.illinois.gov

Updated: 02/05/2020

Indiana

“A valid hunting license is needed to hunt coyote, gray fox, opossum, raccoon, red fox, and striped skunk. (See the chart for season dates.) A continuously burning light that can be seen for at least 500 feet must be carried while pursuing furbearing animals between sunset and sunrise.”

A continuously burning light that can be seen for at least 500 feet must be carried while pursuing furbearing animals between sunset and sunrise.

“It is illegal for a person to deliberately cast a spotlight or other artificial light from a motor vehicle if in possession of any firearm (including a handgun), bow or crossbow. It is also illegal to shine a spotlight, searchlight or other artificial light for the purpose of taking, attempting to take or assisting another person to take any wild animal, excluding furbearing mammals, crayfish and frogs, or while fishing.

In Short:

Coyote, gray fox, opossum, raccoon, red fox, and striped skunk may be hunted at night with a valid hunting license and only during hunting seasons. While the use of night vision is allowed, a continuously burning light that can be seen for at least 500ft must be used as well.

» Download the Regulations

Kathy Skrzypczak
kskrzypczak@dnr.in.gov
 317-232-4080
www.in.gov

Updated: 02/05/2020

Iowa

Raccoon, Opossum, Badger, Striped Skunk, Fox (Red and Gray)
Season: Nov. 2 – Jan. 31, 2020
Shooting Hours: 8 a.m. on First Day

Bobcats
Season: 1 Nov. 2 – Jan. 31, 2020
Shooting Hours: 8 a.m. on First Day
A total of up to three bobcats are allowed per season per licensed furharvester, either hunted or trapped. The bag limit is based on the zone where the bobcat was taken. Additional requirements & zone map on p. 30.

Coyote
Season: Continuous Open
Shooting Hours: No Restrictions

A furharvester license is required to hunt or trap furbearers. Coyote or groundhog may be hunted on a hunting or furharvester license.

“Sights that project a light beam, including laser sights, are not legal for hunting. You cannot cast the rays of a spotlight, headlight or other artificial light on a highway or in a field, woodland or forest for the purpose of spotting, locating, taking or attempting to take or hunt a bird or animal, while having in possession or control, either singly or as one of a group of persons, any firearm, bow or other device capable of killing or taking a bird or animal. This rule does not apply to hunting raccoons or other furbearing animals when they are treed with the aid of dogs.”

“Sights that project a light beam, including laser sights, are not legal for hunting. You cannot cast the rays of a spotlight, headlight or other artificial light on a highway or in a field, woodland or forest for the purpose of spotting, locating, taking or attempting to take or hunt a bird or animal, while having in possession or control, either singly or as one of a group of persons, any firearm, bow or other device capable of killing or taking a bird or animal. This rule does not apply to hunting raccoons or other furbearing animals when they are treed with the aid of dogs.”

In Short:

Raccoon, opossum, badger, striped skunk, fox (red and gray), bobcats, and coyote may be hunted at night. The use of night vision and artificial light is only allowed when allowed animals are treed with the aid of dogs.

» Download the Regulations

Grant Gelly
grant.gelly@dnr.iowa.gov
 515-281-8688
www.iowadnr.com

Updated: 02/05/2020

Kansas

“Furbearers and coyotes may be taken at night. Species legally taken as furbearing animals in Kansas are badger, bobcat, beaver, gray fox, red fox, swift fox, mink, muskrat, opossum, otter, raccoon, striped skunk, and weasel.”

“Furbearers and coyotes may be taken at night, but use of artificial light, including optics that project or amplify light, is prohibited.

“Furbearers and coyotes may be taken at night, but use of artificial light, including optics that project or amplify light, is prohibited. However, hand-held, battery-powered flashlights, hat lamps, or hand-held lanterns may be used with .17 and .22 rimfire rifles and handguns to take trapped furbearers, trapped coyotes, or furbearers treed by dogs”

In Short:

Coyotes, badgers, bobcats, beavers, gray foxes, red foxes, swift foxes, muskrats, opossum, otters, raccoons, striped skunk, and weasels may be hunted at night. The use of night vision is not allowed. Artificial light is only allowed when taking trapped furbearers, coyotes or furbearers treed by dogs.

» Download the Regulations

Marilyn Alberg
marilyn.alberg@ks.gov
 316-342-0658
www.kdwp.state.ks.us

Updated: 02/05/2020

Kentucky

“Coyote, raccoons, and opossums may be taken at night. However, night hunting for coyotes is prohibited on Kentucky lands managed by Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area, Daniel Boone National Forest, George Washington and Jefferson National Forests, Land Between The Lakes National Recreation Area, Clarks River National Wildlife Refuge and Reelfoot National Wildlife Refuge, including Beaver Creek, Cane Creek, Mill Creek, Pioneer Weapons and Redbird wildlife management areas (WMAs).”

“Bobcat, river otter, muskrat, mink, beaver, red fox, gray fox, weasel, and striped skunk may only be hunted one-half hour before sunrise during hunting season.”

“Shotguns are the only legal firearm for night coyote hunting but a shell containing a single projectile may not be used.”

Coyotes may be hunted year-round, day or night, with no bag limit. However, they can be hunted using lights or night vision equipment after daylight hours from Feb. 1 – May 31 only. Lights or other means to make coyotes visible at night cannot be connected to or cast from a mechanized vehicle

“Coyotes may be hunted year-round, day or night, with no bag limit. However, they can be hunted using lights or night vision equipment after daylight hours from Feb. 1 – May 31 only. Lights or other means to make coyotes visible at night cannot be connected to or cast from a mechanized vehicle”

In Short:

Coyote, raccoons, and opossums may be hunted at night, while bobcat, river otter, muskrat, mink, beaver, red fox, gray fox, weasel, and striped skunk may only be hunted one-half hour before sunrise during hunting season. Night vision equipment and artificial light may be used, but cannot be connected to or cast from a mechanized vehicle between Feb. 1 and May 31.

» Download the Regulations

info.center@ky.gov
 800-858-1549
www.kdfwr.state.ky.us/

Updated: 01/29/2020

Louisiana

“Shooting hours are one-half hour before sunrise to one-half hour after sunset, EXCEPT for Raccoon and Opossum which are legal for day and nighttime take. Basic Season License required of all persons hunting Raccoon and Opossum.”

“On private property, the landowner, or his lessee or agent with written permission and the landowner’s contact information in his possession, may take outlaw quadrupeds (coyotes, armadillos and feral hogs), nutria or beaver during the nighttime hours from one-half hour after official sunset on the last day of February to one-half hour after official sunset the last day of August of that same year. Such take may be with or without the aid of artificial light, infrared or laser sighting devices, or night vision devices.”

PROHIBITED ACTIVITIES: Hunting with a bow or crossbow fitted with an infrared, laser sight, electrically operated sight or device specifically designed to enhance vision at night (does NOT include non-projecting red dot sights; RS 56:116.1.(b)(4)).

“On private property, the landowner, or his lessee or agent with written permission and the landowner’s contact information in his possession, may take outlaw quadrupeds (coyotes, armadillos and feral hogs), nutria or beaver during the nighttime hours from one-half hour after official sunset on the last day of February to one-half hour after official sunset the last day of August of that same year. Such take may be with or without the aid of artificial light, infrared or laser sighting devices, or night vision devices.”

PROHIBITED ACTIVITIES: Hunting or taking furbearing animals at night with artificial light EXCEPT it is legal to hunt or take raccoon or opossum at night with lights, provided such hunting or take is conducted with the use of one or more dogs (R.S. 56:116.C.1).”

“On private property, the landowner, or his lessee or agent with written permission and the landowner’s contact information in his possession, may take outlaw quadrupeds (coyotes, armadillos, and feral hogs), nutria or beaver during the nighttime hours from one-half hour after official sunset on the last day of February to one-half hour after official sunset the last day of August of that same year. Such take may be with or without the aid of artificial light, infrared or laser sighting devices, or night vision devices.”

In Short:

On public land – night hunting of raccoon and opossum is allowed but requires a basic season license. The use of night vision equipment and artificial light is allowed, provided dogs are used as well. On private land – coyotes, armadillos, feral hogs, nutria, and beaver may be hunted at night during season Using night vision equipment and artificial is allowed.

» Download the Regulations

Len Yokum
lyokum@wlf.la.gov
 225-765-2350
www.wlf.state.la.us

Updated: 05/20/2020

Maine

“Except as otherwise provided, wild birds and wild animals may not be hunted from ½ hour after sunset until ½ hour before sunrise the following day. Exceptions: migratory game bird, (see page 39), raccoon (see below), and coyote (see page 24).”

Raccoon Night Hunting
Raccoons may be hunted at night during the open season only when the hunter:

  • Is accompanied by a dog.
  • Loads the rifle or handgun only when dispatching a raccoon that is treed or held at bay by a dog or dogs and has been identified by flashlight.”
  • Loads the rifle or handgun only when dispatching a raccoon that is treed or held at bay by a dog or dogs and has been identified by flashlight.”

Coyote Night Hunting
“A Coyote Night Hunting Permit (valid January 1 to December 31, and available for $4*) allows the permit holder to hunt coyote at night (defined as 1/2 hour after sunset until 1/2 hour before sunrise) from December 17 to August 31. Hunters must be in possession of a predator calling device (electronic, hand-held, or mouth-operated). The use of artificial lights to hunt coyote at night is permitted. The use of dogs to hunt coyote at night is prohibited.”

“SUNDAY HUNTING IS ILLEGAL IN MAINE

“Allowed, except for raccoon hunting.”

“From September 1 to December 15, it is unlawful to use artificial lights from ½ hour after sunset until ½ hour before sunrise to illuminate, jack, locate, attempt to locate or show up wild birds or animals, except raccoons, which may be hunted at night with electric flashlights during the open season (see General Hunting Provisions for details). An exception to this may be made for agents appointed by the commissioner to hunt coyotes at night during this period under policies established by MDIFW.”

Coyote Night Hunting

“The use of artificial lights to hunt coyote at night is permitted.”

In Short:

Raccoon and Coyote night hunting is allowed. Using night-vision and artificial light for coyote night hunting is allowed, whereas only an electric flashlight may be used for hunting raccoons at night. Using night-vision equipment is not allowed for raccoon hunting.

» Download the Regulations

Debbie Jacques
debbie.jacques@maine.gov
 207-287-8000
www.maine.gov

Updated: 05/02/2020

Maryland

“Daytime and nighttime hunting for foxes is permitted during the legal harvest season for foxes.

Coyotes can be hunted at night during the specified season. At all other times of the year, coyotes may only be hunted during daylight hours (one half hour before sunrise to one half hour after sunset).

Raccoons that are destroying muskrats and/or their dens may be hunted any time of the year by owners of the affected marshlands or their employees.

“Telescopic and laser sights may be used on all devices legal for hunting furbearers.”

“The use of artificial light and/or dogs is permitted while hunting coyotes, foxes, opossums or raccoons on foot.”

In Short:

Coyotes and foxes may be hunted at night during the specified season, while certain restrictions are applied to raccoon night hunting. Using night vision equipment and artificial light is allowed for these animals.

» Download the Regulations

Paul Peditto
paul.peditto@maryland.gov
 410-260-8540
www.dnr.state.md.us

Updated: 01/30/2020

Massachusetts

RABBIT AND HARE HUNTING
“Hunting hours begin 1/2 hour before sunrise and ends at midnight. (Exception: on any WMAs stocked with pheasant or quail during the pheasant or quail season, hunting hours are sunrise to sunset. See WMA Regulations page 21.)

COYOTE HUNTING
“Hunting hours begin 1/2 hour before sunrise and end at midnight. There are two exceptions:

  • Hunting hours start at sunrise and end at sunset on WMAs stocked with pheasant or quail during the pheasant or quail season.
  • Hunting hours start 1/2 hour before sunrise and end 1/2 hour after sunset during shotgun deer season.

Rifles and handguns: During the period from 1/2 hour after sunset to midnight rifles are restricted to those chambered not larger than .22 long rifle and handguns are restricted to those chambered not larger than .38 caliber.”

FOX HUNTING
“Hunting hours begin 1/2 hour before sunrise and end at midnight. (Except on WMAs stocked with pheasant or quail during the pheasant or quail season, hunting hours are sunrise to sunset).

Rifles and handguns: During the period from 1/2 hour after sunset to midnight rifles are restricted to those chambered not larger than .22 long rifle and handguns are restricted to those chambered not larger than .38 caliber.

RACCOON AND OPOSSUM HUNTING
“Raccoon and opossum may be hunted 24 hours per day. Exception: WMAs stocked with pheasant or quail during the pheasant or quail season, the hunting hours for raccoon and opossum are from 9:00 P.M. to 3:00 A.M.

Rifles and handguns: During the period from 1/2 hour after sunset to 1/2 hour before sunrise, rifles are restricted to those chambered not larger than .22 long rifle and handguns are restricted to those chambered not larger than .38 caliber.”

“Night vision products that utilize ambient light are allowable to aid hunting. Anything that projects a beam of light is prohibited.”

“Coyotes, foxes, opossums or raccoons may be hunted on foot at nighttime during open season with the use of a dog and light.”

In Short:

Night hunting of rabbits, hare, coyote, fox, raccoon, and opossum is allowed, but certain restrictions do apply. Night vision equipment is allowed, provided that is does not project a beam of light. The use of artificial light is allowed for coyote, fox, raccoon and opossum night hunting only.

» Download the Regulations

mass.wildlife@mass.gov
 508-792-7270
www.mass.gov

Updated: 02/06/2020

Michigan

“The following nighttime hunting regulations apply to raccoon, opossum, fox (red and gray), and coyote.

Season Dates:

  • Coyote: Year-round
  • Fox (Gray and Red): Oct. 15 – Mar. 1
  • Opossum: Year-round
  • Raccoon: Oct. 1 – Jan. 31
  • Nighttime hunters must use a game call or predator call, or use the aid of dogs.
    Dogs cannot be used Apr. 16 – Jul. 7.
    When hunting with dogs, an individual may only possess a loaded firearm, a cocked crossbow, or bow with a nocked arrow at the point of kill.

A licensed individual may travel afoot with ONLY: a bow and arrow; a crossbow; a rimfire firearm .22 caliber or smaller; a shotgun with loads other than buckshot larger than size 3, slug, or cut shell; a centerfire rifle or centerfire pistol .269 caliber or smaller.

Firearm restrictions during deer season(s) must be followed from Nov. 10 – 30. See pg. 20 for more information.

It is unlawful to use a centerfire rifle or centerfire pistol to take an animal during nighttime hours in any state park or state recreation area statewide, and on public lands in the Limited Firearm Deer Zone.

All fur harvesters taking a furbearing animal, day or night, from Nov. 10-14, must have a fur harvester license and must use a .22 or smaller caliber rimfire.”

“There are no optic restrictions (scopes, open sights, thermal, infrared, laser sights may all be used by individuals complying with nighttime regulations above).

“Individuals in compliance with the above regulations may use artificial lights of the type ordinarily held in the hand or on the person.”

In Short:

Coyote, gray fox, red fox, opossum, and raccoon night hunting is allowed, but certain restrictions apply. Night vision and artificial light is allowed, provided the general night hunting regulations are followed.

» Download the Regulations

lawenforcement@michigan.gov
 517-373-1263
www.michigan.gov

Updated: 01/29/2020

Minnesota

Raccoons
“Night hunting: A person may take raccoons between ½ hour after sunset and ½ hour before sunrise only in accordance with the following regulations:

  • Hunters must be on foot.
  • Artificial lights may be used to locate, attempt to locate, or shoot a raccoon only if the raccoon has been treed or put at bay by dogs.
  • Rifles and handguns used must be .17 or .22 caliber rimfire (including .22 magnum).
  • Shotgun shells may not contain shot larger than No. 4 bird shot.

Other restrictions:

  • A person may pursue and tree raccoons with dogs, during the closed season and without a license.
  • A person may not take a raccoon in a den or hollow tree, or by cutting down a tree occupied by a raccoon.”

Fox and coyote:
“A person hunting for coyote or fox from January 1 to March 15 may use an artificial handheld light if they meet ALL of the following conditions—you are:

  • on foot and not within a public right-of-way,
  • using a shotgun,
  • using a calling device, and
  • more than 200 feet from a vehicle

“A person legally taking coyote or fox may possess and use night vision or thermal imaging equipment. See page 31.”

Raccoons
“Artificial lights may be used to locate, attempt to locate, or shoot a raccoon only if the raccoon has been treed or put at bay by dogs.”

Fox and coyote night hunting
“A person hunting for coyote or fox from January 1 to March 15 may use an artificial handheld light if they meet ALL of the following conditions—you are:

  • on foot and not within a public right-of-way,
  • using a shotgun,
  • using a calling device, and
  • more than 200 feet from a vehicle”

In Short:

Raccoons, foxes, and coyote may be hunted at night with artificial light, but certain restrictions do apply. Using night vision equipment is only allowed when hunting coyote or fox.

» Download the Regulations

James Abernathy
info.dnr@state.mn.us
 651-296-6157
www.dnr.state.mn.us

Updated: 02/11/2020

Mississippi

“Raccoon, fox, opossum, beaver, nutria, coyotes, and bobcats may be legally hunted at night, with or without the use of a light and with dogs, except during the spring turkey season. Hunters may hunt raccoon with dogs during the spring turkey season with a permit issued from MDWFP. These permits may be obtained online at mdwfp.com. Landowners, leaseholders, or their designated agents may take nuisance animals year-round on lands owned or leased by them. Beaver, coyotes, nutria, fox, skunk, and wild hogs are classified as nuisance species and can be taken year round by licensed hunters subject to applicable regulations (see MDWFP Rule 7.1).”

No restrictions listed in the 2020 Mississippi Outdoor Digest

“Raccoon, fox, opossum, beaver, nutria, coyotes, and bobcats may be legally hunted at night, with or without the use of a light

In Short:

Night hunting of raccoon, fox, opossum, beaver, nutria, coyotes, and bobcats is allowed. The use of artificial light is allowed when hunting these animals. No restrictions for night vision equipment are listed in the regulations and is therefore assumed allowed.

» Download the Regulations

Megan Fedrick
megan.fedrick@wfp.ms.gov
 601-432-2400
www.mdwfp.com

Updated: 02/15/2020

Missouri

Coyote Taken With Hunting Permit:
“All year, except coyotes may not be hunted during daylight hours from April 1–19, 2020. During spring turkey season, coyotes may be taken using only methods allowed for spring turkey hunting, and hunters must have an unfilled spring turkey hunting permit and either a Resident Small Game Hunting Permit or a Nonresident Furbearer Hunting and Trapping Permit”

Badger, Bobcat, Gray Fox, Red Fox, Opossum, Raccoon, and Striped Skunk Taken With a Hunting Permit:
“Season: Nov. 15, 2020–Jan. 31, 2021”

Groundhog Hunting:
“Season: May 11, 2020–Dec. 15, 2020”

Squirrel Hunting:
“Season: May 23, 2020–Feb. 15, 2021”

Bullfrog and Green Frog Hunting:
“Season: June 30 at sunset–Oct. 31, 2020”

“You may not possess night vision or thermal imagery equipment while carrying a firearm, bow, or other implement used to take wildlife.”

Artificial lights may be used only to hunt bullfrogs and green frogs, or to hunt raccoons and other furbearing animals when treed by dogs. Using lights to search for, harass, or disturb other wildlife is prohibited. Landowners may use lights on their property, but while doing so may not be in possession of, or be with someone who possesses, a firearm, bow, or other implement used to take wildlife.

In Short:

Night hunting of furbearers and frogs is allowed, but season and permit restrictions do apply. Artificial light may be used when hunting frogs but may only be used to hunt furbearers when treed by dogs. The use of night vision equipment is not allowed.

» Download the Regulations

Thomas Strother
tom.strother@mdc.mo.gov
 601-432-2400
www.mdc.mo.gov

Updated: 03/02/2020

Montana

“You can hunt at night for predators and non-game species only

Montana statute classifies predators as coyote, weasel, (striped) skunk, and civet cat (spotted skunk).

Montana statute classifies predators as coyote, weasel, (striped) skunk, and civet cat (spotted skunk). Predator shooting is not regulated by federal or state law or regulation. Predators can be shot in Montana year-round without a license by both resident and nonresident hunters. A Conservation License, or a state school trust lands recreational use license, is required to shoot predators on state school trust lands. Permission must be obtained to shoot predators on private land.

Nongame species are defined as any wild animal not otherwise legally classified by statute or regulation in Montana; examples include badger, raccoon, red fox, hares, rabbits, ground squirrels, marmots, tree squirrels, porcupines, and prairie dogs.”

“You can hunt with night vision equipment and thermal imaging equipment at night for predators and non-game species only

Montana statute classifies predators as coyote, weasel, (striped) skunk, and civet cat (spotted skunk). Nongame species are defined as any wild animal not otherwise legally classified by statute or regulation in Montana; examples include badger, raccoon, red fox, hares, rabbits, ground squirrels, marmots, tree squirrels, porcupines, and prairie dogs.”

“You can hunt at night with or without lights for predators or non-game species.

Montana statute classifies predators as coyote, weasel, (striped) skunk, and civet cat (spotted skunk). Nongame species are defined as any wild animal not otherwise legally classified by statute or regulation in Montana; examples include badger, raccoon, red fox, hares, rabbits, ground squirrels, marmots, tree squirrels, porcupines, and prairie dogs.”

In Short:

Badger, raccoon, red fox, hares, rabbits, ground squirrels, marmots, tree squirrels, porcupines, prairie dogs, coyote, weasel, striped skunk, and civet cat (spotted skunk) can be hunted at night with permission from the landowner. The use of night vision equipment, as well as artificial lights, is allowed.

» Download the Regulations

Chris Fetherston
cfetherston@mt.gov
 406-444-2535
www.fwp.mt.gov

Updated: 02/25/2020

Nebraska

“FURBEARER HUNTING AND TRAPPING:

Trap only: Muskrat and Beaver;
Hunt or trap: Bobcat, Mink, Raccoon, Badger, Red Fox, Gray Fox, Virginia Opossum, Long-tailed Weasel, Striped Skunk

FURBEARER HUNTING AND TRAPPING HOURS
24 hours a day”

COYOTES, PRAIRIE DOGS AND OTHER NONGAME
Residents do not need a permit to hunt these species; however, nonresidents must have a hunt (small game) permit.”

No restrictions listed in the Nebraska Game Parks Hunting Guide

Artificial lights may be used only while hunting on foot to take unprotected species, including coyotes and the following furbearers: badger, bobcat, gray fox, long-tailed weasel, mink, Virginia opossum, raccoon, red fox and striped skunk. They may not be used to take any of these species if used from or attached to a vehicle or boat.

In Short:

Night hunting of furbearers coyotes, prairie dogs, and other nongame species is allowed, but season and permit restrictions do apply. Artificial light may be used when night hunting only while on foot. The use of night vision equipment is not listed as a restriction and is therefore assumed as allowed.

» Download the Regulations

Duane Arp
duane.arp@nebraska.gov
 402-471-0641
www.ngpc.state.ne.us

Updated: 02/28/2020

Nevada

“Hunting at night is not allowed.”

“Hunting at night is not allowed.”

“Hunting at night is not allowed.”

In Short:

Night hunting, night vision, and artificial light are not allowed in the state of Nevada.

» Download the Regulations

Julie Meadows
jmeadows@ndow.org
 775-688-1500
www.ndow.org

Updated: 01/29/2020

New Hampshire

Coyote:
“Coyotes may be hunted at night from Jan. 1 through March 31. Lights may be used, except from a motor vehicle, snowmobile, or OHRV. Coyote night hunters are restricted to shotguns, .22 caliber rimfire, muzzleloaders, or archery equipment in those towns with special rules (see page 22).”

Raccoon
“Raccoon may be hunted at night. It is illegal to use a rifle or pistol larger than .22 caliber, or shot size larger than number 4 birdshot. It is illegal to take raccoons using a light from a motor vehicle or OHRV.”

Furbearer Hunting Licensing Requirements
“Hunters must have a current Regular N.H. Hunting, Combination, or Archery License. A Small Game License does not allow for the hunting of furbearers.”

No restrictions listed in the New Hampshire Hunting & trapping Digest

Coyote:
Lights may be used, except from a motor vehicle, snowmobile, or OHRV.

Raccoon
It is illegal to take raccoons using a light from a motor vehicle or OHRV.

In Short:

During season, night hunting of coyote and raccoon is allowed – but caliber restrictions do apply. Artificial light is allowed, but not from a motor vehicle, snowmobile, or OHRV. No restrictions for night vision are listed in the regulations and are therefore assumed allowed.

» Download the Regulations

Julie Meadows
jmeadows@ndow.org
 603-271-3422
www.wildlife.state.nh.us

Updated: 01/29/2020

New Jersey

“A Fish and Wildlife-issued permit is required to hunt coyote or fox under the provisions (see table, page 54) of the Special Permit Coyote and Fox Season; as follows: A permit to hunt coyote or fox is required 1.) to hunt at night and/or 2.) to use shot sizes larger than #4 fine and up to size #3 Buck, and/or 3.) to use a rifle for coyote or fox other than incidental to deer hunting (see Table / QR Code on preceding page). Sunday hunting is not legal.”

Raccoon and Opossum
“Hunting may not begin until one hour after sunset on the opening day of the season. On all other days open during the season, the hours of hunting are one hour after sunset to one hour before sunrise. Persons may hunt raccoon and opossum on Sunday mornings only between the hours of 12:01 a.m. and one hour before sunrise during the prescribed season.

Hunting methods: Portable lights are permitted. Fluorescent orange is encouraged but not required on outer clothing while hunting raccoons and opossum. A current and valid Rifle Permit is required when possessing a .22 caliber rifle while hunting raccoon and opossum. Only .22 caliber shorts are permitted.”

No restrictions listed in the New Jersey Hunting & trapping Digest

“Hunting methods: Portable lights are permitted.

“Hunting for or shooting any wildlife by aid of a light is prohibited , except when hunting raccoon, opossum while on foot or when hunting coyote/fox during the special coyote/fox season

In Short:

During season, night hunting of raccoon, opossum, coyote, and fox is allowed in the state of New Jersey – but caliber restrictions do apply. Artificial light is allowed, but only while on foot. No restrictions for night vision are listed in the regulations and are therefore assumed allowed.

» Download the Regulations

Paul Tarlowe
njfishandwildlife@dep.nj.gov
 609-292-2965
www.njfishandwildlife.com

Updated: 02/11/2020

New Mexico

“Legal shooting hours for big game, upland game, furbearers and turkey are from 1/2 hour before sunrise to 1/2 hour after sunset, unless otherwise noted.”

“Legal shooting hours for big game, upland game, furbearers and turkey are from 1/2 hour before sunrise to 1/2 hour after sunset, unless otherwise noted.”

“It is unlawful to: Shine spotlights or other artificial lights into areas where big-game species or livestock may be present, while in possession of any sporting arm, except as permitted by rule for raccoon (page 127).”

In Short:

Night hunting, night vision, and artificial light are not allowed in the state of New Mexico.

» Download the Regulations

Lisa Brejcha
ispa@state.nm.us
 800-862-9310
www.wildlife.state.nm.us

Updated: 01/30/2020

New York

“To hunt furbearers, you must possess a resident or non-resident hunting license. A trapping license does not allow you to hunt furbearers. Furbearers may be hunted with a bow, crossbow or firearm as described below.

You may hunt red and gray fox, coyote, bobcat, raccoon, skunk, mink, weasel and opossum”

Hunting Furbearers at Night: Hunters should consult with local government officials for any laws that may prohibit the discharge of firearms at night”

“Hunting Furbearers at Night: Spotlights, night vision, thermal and laser devices are permitted for furbearer hunting. They may be attached to the firearm. All laws pertaining to the use of a spotlight apply.“

“Hunting Furbearers at Night: Spotlights, night vision, thermal and laser devices are permitted for furbearer hunting. They may be attached to the firearm. All laws pertaining to the use of a spotlight apply.

In Short:

Night hunting of red and gray fox, coyote, bobcat, raccoon, skunk, mink, weasel and opossum is allowed. Night vision and artificial light is also allowed.

» Download the Regulations

Alexandra Yattaw
alexandra.yattaw@dec.ny.gov
 518-402-8924
www.dec.ny.gov

Updated: 01/30/2020

North Carolina

“Game birds and animals may be taken only between 30 minutes before sunrise and 30 minutes after sunset with rifle, pistol, shotgun, archery equipment, dogs or by means of fal­conry with the following exceptions: raccoons, feral swine and opossums may be taken at night. Coyotes may be taken at night in all counties except Beaufort, Dare, Hyde, Tyrrell and Washington.”

No restrictions listed in the North Carolina General Hunting Regulations

“It is unlawful to use any of the following in taking wild birds or animals:

  • artificial lights (including laser sights), except for big game retrieval and taking feral swine and coyotes at night.

“Raccoon and opossum may be taken at night, with dogs during open seasons, with the use of artificial lights commonly used to aid in taking raccoon and opossum. Where feral swine and coyotes may be hunted at night, artificial light may be used.”

In Short:

Night hunting of raccoons, feral swine and opossums are allowed. Coyote hunting is allowed in all counties except for except Beaufort, Dare, Hyde, Tyrrell, and Washington. Artificial light is allowed and no restrictions for night vision are listed in the regulations so are therefore assumed allowed.

» Download the Regulations

wrceducation@ncwildlife.org
 919-733-7291
www.ncwildlife.org

Updated: 02/06/2020

North Dakota

“Coyote and fox (red and gray) may be hunted at any hour. Any person who engages in coyote or fox hunting from 30 minutes after sunset to 30 minutes before sunrise must hunt exclusively on foot. Allows the use of artificial light, night vision, thermal vision or infrared light with a power source of not more than 6 volts. The artificial light must produce a red, green or amber color. Opens: November 25 – Closes: March 15.”

“Beaver and raccoon may also be taken at any hour of the day, while hunting on foot, with the aid of artifical lights, night vision, thermal vision or infrared light with a power source of not more than 6 volts. The artificial light must produce a red, green or amber color except when taking a raccoon treed or at bay. Legal firearms for flashlight hunting of beaver and raccoon are rifles or handguns firing a rimfire cartridge no larger than .22 caliber, or shotguns no larger than .410 gauge. Rifled slugs are not legal. Open year-round (officially from April 1 – March 31).”

“Use of artificial light, night vision, thermal vision or infrared light for locating or hunting game is prohibited, except for beaver, raccoon, fox, and coyote.”

“Use of artificial light, night vision, thermal vision or infrared light for locating or hunting game is prohibited, except for beaver, raccoon, fox, and coyote.”

In Short:

Coyote and fox (red and gray), beaver and raccoon may be hunted at night, but only on foot. The use of night vision and artificial light is also allowed when hunting these animals.

» Download the Regulations

ndgf@nd.gov
 701-328-6300
www.gf.nd.gov

Updated: 01/29/2020

Ohio

FOX, RACCOON, SKUNK, OPOSSUM, AND WEASEL
“No restrictions on hours except during the seven-day deer gun season, Dec. 2-8, 2019. These species may not be hunted between 30 minutes before sunrise to 30 minutes after sunset during the seven-day deer gun season. Hunters must purchase a hunting license and a fur taker permit to hunt these species.”

GROUNDHOG HUNTING
“No restriction on hours. Closed only during the seven-day deer gun season, Dec. 2-8, 2019.”

COYOTE HUNTING AND TRAPPING
“If hunted during the deer gun season, hours and legal hunting devices are the same as for deer gun season. Rifles and night vision scopes are legal for coyote hunting; however, rifles and night hunting between 30 minutes after sunset and 30 minutes before sunrise are prohibited during any deer gun and deer muzzleloader seasons.”

FERAL SWINE (WILD BOAR)
“Feral swine are a non-native, invasive species. Feral swine are also known as wild boar, feral hogs, and feral pigs. Hunters are encouraged to report all sightings to the Division of Wildlife at wildohio.gov/reportwildlife. You must possess a valid hunting license to hunt feral swine. If hunted during the deer gun season, hours and legal hunting devices are the same as for deer gun season. Rifles and night vision scopes are legal for feral swine hunting; however, rifles and night hunting between 30 minutes after sunset to 30 minutes before sunrise are prohibited during any deer gun and deer muzzleloader seasons.”

TRAPPERS MAY NOT DO THE FOLLOWING:

“Pursue, hunt, trap, or snare furbearing animals between sunset and sunrise without use of a continuous white light visible for at least 1/4-mile. However, persons hunting fox, coyote, or raccoon with a call from a stationary position may use a continuous single beam of light of any color. When two or more people are hunting or trapping together for these animals only one light is required and may be carried by any member of the party.”

“Rifles and night vision scopes are legal for coyote hunting; however, rifles and night hunting between 30 minutes after sunset and 30 minutes before sunrise are prohibited during any deer gun and deer muzzleloader seasons.

Rifles and night vision scopes are legal for feral swine hunting; however, rifles and night hunting between 30 minutes after sunset to 30 minutes before sunrise are prohibited during any deer gun and deer muzzleloader seasons.”

“Pursue, hunt, trap, or snare furbearing animals between sunset and sunrise without use of a continuous white light visible for at least 1/4-mile. However, persons hunting fox, coyote, or raccoon with a call from a stationary position may use a continuous single beam of light of any color. When two or more people are hunting or trapping together for these animals only one light is required and may be carried by any member of the party.”

In Short:

Fox, raccoon, skunk, opossum, weasel, groundhog, coyote, and feral swine may be hunted at night but restrictions apply, particularly during deer season. Night vision is allowed when hunting coyote and feral swine, but not during deer season. The use of a continuous white light visible for at least 1/4-mile is required when hunting fur-bearing animals at night.

» Download the Regulations

ohio@fws.gov
 614-265-6300
www.ohiodnr.com

Updated: 02/26/2020

Oklahoma

FURBEARER / PREDATOR

“Nighttime only: Hunters may possess a .22 caliber rimfire rifle or .22 caliber rimfire pistol and a light carried on the person while in pursuit of furbearers with hounds during the legal, open furbearer season, while possessing a valid hunting license, unless exempt.”

HOGS:

Private Lands:
“Hogs may be taken year-round on private land during daylight hours or at night with permission from the private property owner, lessee or occupant of the land. The pursuit of feral hogs with a shotgun on private property is not restricted by shot size. There is no restriction on method of take of feral hogs on private property.”

Public Lands:
“Pursuit of hogs at night is prohibited from Oct. 1 – Jan. 15 and during any spring turkey season.Pursuit of hogs at night is prohibited from Oct. 1 – Jan. 15 and during any spring turkey season.Pursuit of hogs at night is prohibited from Oct. 1 – Jan. 15 and during any spring turkey season.”

“Pursuit of hogs at night during any other time of the year has the following restrictions: Use of a firearm is prohibited

Laser sights: Nothing in this section shall prevent a person from possessing a .22 caliber rimfire rifle or pistol with a laser sighting device while hunting or taking furbearers with hounds during legal, open furbearer season, while possessing a valid hunting license.”

Headlighting / Spotlighting
No person may attempt to take, take, attempt to catch, catch, attempt to capture, capture, attempt to kill, or kill any deer, feral animal or other wildlife, except fish and frogs or except as provided by law, by the use of a vehicle-mounted spotlight or other powerful light at night, by what is commonly known as “headlighting” (or “spotlighting”) or use any light enhancement device (night scope). Provided, however, nothing in this code shall prevent one from possessing a .22 caliber rimfire rifle or .22 caliber rimfire pistol and a light carried on his person while in pursuit of furbearers with hounds during the legal open furbearer season, while possessing a valid hunting license and fur license, unless exempt.”

Coyote: Statewide: open year-round No daily, season or possession limit. Open statewide year-round, except it shall be unlawful to hunt, take or attempt to take coyotes from dark to daylight with the aid of any artificial light and/or any sight dog. Persons attempting to hunt at night must first obtain a permit from the county game warden and must use a shotgun, utilizing size six (6) shot or smaller.”

In Short:

Night hunting of furbearers/predators, as well as hogs, is allowed. Season and caliber restrictions do apply. Laser sights and artificial light may be used when taking furbearers with hounds. Coyotes, however, may not be hunted with the aid of artificial light or dogs.

» Download the Regulations

ohio@fws.gov
 614-265-6300
www.ohiodnr.com

Updated: 02/26/2020

Oregon

“During open Pursuit Seasons no animals shall be killed except during authorized open harvest seasons. A record card must be in possession to harvest bobcat. A Furtaker’s License or Hunting License for Furbearers must be in possession to hunt or pursue.”

“A resident does not need a license to hunt on land upon which the person resides and is owned by the person or a member of the person’s immediate family, unless they are hunting for a species for which a tag is required or are applying for big game tags.”

“A landowner or landowner agent does not need a hunting or trapping license to take predatory animals on land they own, lease, lawfully occupy, possess, or have charge or dominion over.”

It is unlawful to:

“Hunt, locate, or scout for the purpose of hunting any wildlife with infrared or other night vision sight or equipment except trail cameras.”

“Bobcat, opossum and raccoon may be hunted with the aid of an artificial light provided the light is not cast from or attached to a motor vehicle or boat.”

In Short:

Night hunting is allowed during the specified seasons and with the correct hunting license. A landowner does not require a license to take prefatory animals on their land. The use of night vision is not allowed but artificial light may be used when hunting bobcat, opossum, and raccoon provided it is not cast from or attached to a motor vehicle or boat.

» Download the Regulations

odfw.info@state.or.us
 503-872-5268
www.dfw.state.or.us

Updated: 01/29/2020

Pennsylvania

“Raccoons, foxes, coyotes*, bobcats, striped skunks, opossums and weasels may be hunted any hour, day or night, except during restricted periods noted in Exception 1 (see furtaking section for more detail).

*Note: Outside of any big game season (deer, bear, elk or turkey), coyotes may be taken with a hunting or furtaker license, and without wearing orange. During any big game season, coyotes may be taken while lawfully hunting big game (must follow orange requirements), or with a furtaker license.”

“Foxes can but raccoons cannot be hunted on Sundays. Foxes and raccoons may be hunted any hour, day or night, except during the regular antlered or antlered/antlerless deer seasons, and during that time they may be hunted only after the legal hours for deer.”

“Lighted pins on bow sights and scopes with lighted reticles may be used as long as they don’t cast a beam. Any device used as a sight or scope on any firearm, bow or crossbow that projects a light beam of any kind onto the target is unlawful.”

“A person hunting raccoons, skunks, opossums, bobcats, weasels, foxes and coyotes on foot may use a handheld light, including a gun-mounted light. Furbearer hunters may not use a flashlight or spotlight that projects a laser light beam.”

In Short:

Raccoons, foxes, coyotes, bobcats, striped skunks, opossums, and weasels may be hunted at night, except during restricted periods. The use of night vision equipment is allowed provided that it does not cast a beam of light. Artificial light may also be used, provided it does not project a laser light beam.

» Download the Regulations

pgc-swregion@pa.gov
 717-787-4250
www.pgc.state.pa.us

Updated: 01/29/2020

Rhode Island

“Legal Shooting Hours: Raccoon 6:00 PM October 1 until 11:59 PM of the last day of February. Night hunting of raccoons with shot larger than No. 4 or rifles larger than .22 cal. rimfire long-rifle is prohibited.”

The use or possession of laser sights that project a beam or night-vision equipment while hunting is prohibited (RIHR 9.7.2.G).

“The use of a light, other than a kerosene lantern (excluding the pressure type) or a flashlight with more than six (6) cells, is prohibited. No person may take or attempt to take raccoons by use of a light from a motor vehicle.”

In Short:

Only raccoons may be hunted at night in the state of Rhode Island, caliber restrictions apply. Night vision equipment is not allowed, and only the use of a kerosene lantern or flashlight with 6 or fewer cells is allowed.

» Download the Regulations

Sarah Riley
sarah.riley@dem.ri.gov
 401-222-6647
www.dem.ri.gov

Updated: 02/11/2020

South Carolina

“Night hunting is unlawful except that raccoons, opossums, foxes, mink, skunk, coyotes, armadillos and hogs may be hunted at night. Information related to hunting coyotes, armadillos and feral hogs during night is provided on page 71 of this document under specific headings for these animals.”

“No buckshot or any shot larger than a No. 4, or any ammunition larger than .22 rimfire may be used.”

“Raccoons, opossums, foxes, mink, and skunk may not be hunted with artificial lights except when treed or cornered with dogs. Devices that amplify light using some type of power source (including night vision and infrared devices) are considered artificial light”

“Raccoons, opossums, foxes, mink, and skunk may not be hunted with artificial lights except when treed or cornered with dogs. Devices that amplify light using some type of power source (including night vision and infrared devices) are considered artificial light”

In Short:

Raccoons, opossums, foxes, mink, skunk, coyotes, armadillos, and hogs may be hunted at night with caliber restrictions. The use of night vision and artificial light is allowed only when animals are treed or cornered with dogs.

» Download the Regulations

 803-734-3886
www.dnr.state.sc.us

Updated: 02/06/2020

South Dakota

Red and Grey Fox, Badger, Raccoon, Skunk, Opossum, Jackrabbit, Coyote:

  • Year Round

Bobcat:

  • West River Dec. 26 – Feb.15
  • East River x Dec. 26 – Jan. 19

Beaver:

  • West River: Year-round
  • Black Hills: Jan. 1 – March 31 + Nov. 2 – April 30
  • East River: Nov. 2 – April 30

Muskrat:

  • West River: Year-round
  • Black Hills: Nov. 2 – April 30
  • East River: Nov. 2 – April 30
  • Shooting: April 1 – Aug. 31

Mink, Weasel:

  • Nov. 2 – Jan. 31

“During the time from sunset to sunrise, no person may use or possess night-vision equipment or throw or cast the rays of a spotlight, headlight, or other artificial light on any highway, or in any field, pasture, woodland, forest, or prairie, for the purpose of spotting, locating, taking or attempting to take or hunt any animal while having in possession or control any firearm, bow or other implement whereby any game could be killed. However:

  • A person may use a hand held light while on foot, to take raccoons after they have been treed by dogs;
  • A landowner or occupant and no more than two guests accompanied by the landowner or occupant may use an artificial light and night vision equipment on the owner’s or occupant’s land, with a shotgun using shot shells only or a firearm using a rimfire cartridge in the taking of jackrabbits, coyotes, beaver during its hunting season, foxes, raccoons, opossums, badgers, skunks, or rodents;
  • A landowner or occupant, 18 years of age or older, and no more than two guests accompanied by the landowner or occupant may use night vision equipment on the owner’s or occupant’s land, with a firearm using a cartridge with a bullet diameter below .225 inches, in the taking of jackrabbits, coyotes, beaver during its hunting season, foxes, raccoons, opossums, badgers, skunks, or rodents; and
  • A landowner or occupant, 18 years of age or older, may issue written permission to no more than two guests who may hunt unaccompanied by the landowner or occupant. Any unaccompanied guest may use night vision equipment on the owner’s or occupant’s land, with a firearm using a cartridge with a bullet diameter below .225 inches, in the taking of jackrabbits, coyotes, beaver during its hunting season, foxes, raccoons, opossums, badgers, skunks, or rodents. Night-vision equipment includes thermal imaging equipment and is an optical device utilizing light amplifying circuits that are electrical or battery powered.

“During the time from sunset to sunrise, no person may use or possess night-vision equipment or throw or cast the rays of a spotlight, headlight, or other artificial light on any highway, or in any field, pasture, woodland, forest, or prairie, for the purpose of spotting, locating, taking or attempting to take or hunt any animal while having in possession or control any firearm, bow or other implement whereby any game could be killed. However:

  • A person may use a hand held light while on foot, to take raccoons after they have been treed by dogs;
  • A landowner or occupant and no more than two guests accompanied by the landowner or occupant may use an artificial light and night vision equipment on the owner’s or occupant’s land, with a shotgun using shot shells only or a firearm using a rimfire cartridge in the taking of jackrabbits, coyotes, beaver during its hunting season, foxes, raccoons, opossums, badgers, skunks, or rodents;

In Short:

Night hunting of furbearers is allowed in South Dakota. Red and Grey Fox, Badger, Raccoon, Skunk, Opossum, Jackrabbit, and Coyote may be hunted year-round. Bobcat, beaver, muskrat, mink, and weasel have season restrictions. The use of night vision and artificial light is allowed, with certain restrictions.

» Download the Regulations

wildinfo@state.sd.us
 605-773-3485
www.sdgfp.info

Updated: 02/06/2020

Tennessee

“Hunting of bullfrogs, raccoons, opossums, the chasing of foxes and rabbits, and the trapping of furbearers is permitted day or night unless restricted by Proclamation. No foxes or rabbits may be shot while chasing/training at night.”

“Landowners have more opportunity than ever before to control wild hogs on their properties. They can shoot wild hogs year-round during the day without limit and trap with bait outside of big game seasons. Furthermore, landowners may obtain an exemption from their TWRA regional office enabling them to kill wild hogs at night using a spotlight, trap year-round,etc.”

Use or possession of the following equipment is prohibited:

  • Any electronic light amplifying night vision scope, thermal imaging device, or device while in possession of a firearm or archery tackle between sunset and sunrise.

Use or possession of the following equipment is prohibited:

  • Firearms or archery equipment with any device utilizing an artificial light capable of locating wildlife

Landowners have more opportunity than ever before to control wild hogs on their properties. They can shoot wild hogs year-round during the day without limit and trap with bait outside of big game seasons. Furthermore, landowners may obtain an exemption from their TWRA regional office enabling them to kill wild hogs at night using a spotlight, trap year-round,etc.

In Short:

Bullfrogs, raccoons, opossums, the chasing of foxes and rabbits may but hunted at night but foxes or rabbits may be shot while chasing/training at night. Private landowners may hunt wild hogs at night using a spotlight. All other use of night vision or artificial light is not allowed.

» Download the Regulations

Ed Carter
ask.twra@tn.gov
 615-781-6500
www.state.tn.us

Updated: 01/29/2020

Texas

Fur-bearing Animals

A person who possesses a hunting license may take a fur-bearing animal (furbearer), provided the furbearer (or any part thereof) is not to be sold or exchanged for anything of value. There is no bag or possession limit on furbearers. A trapper’s license is required for the take of furbearers for the sale of pelts and/or carcasses. Fur-bearing animals include:

  • Badger
  • Beaver
  • Fox
  • Mink
  • Muskrat
  • Nutria
  • Opossum
  • Otter
  • Ring-tailed cat
  • Raccoon
  • Skunk

Nongame Species

A hunting license is required for the take of nongame species. There are no closed seasons, bag limits or possession limits; and, they may be hunted at any time by any lawful means or methods on private property. There may be restrictions for certain species of nongame animals (see below). In addition, be aware that public hunting lands may also have additional restrictions. If hunting at night, please make a courtesy telephone call to your local game warden (512-389-4848). NONGAME ANIMALS (included, but not limited to the following):

  • Armadillos
  • Bobcats
  • Coyotes
  • Flying squirrels
  • Frogs
  • Ground squirrel
  • Mountain lions
  • Porcupines
  • Prairie dogs
  • Rabbits and Hares
  • Turtles (freshwater)

“Night vision devices may not be used on game species – which may not be hunted at night regardless – but are acceptable for use while hunting non-game and exotics.”

“Furbearers may be hunted at night on private property with the aid of an artificial light.”

No person may use artificial light from a motor vehicle to locate, capture, or attempt to capture a reptile or amphibian.

In Short:

Furbearing and non-game animals may be hunted at night. Night vision and artificial light may be used to hunt these animals. No license is required to hunt hogs and coyotes and there are no limits or restrictions on these animals.

» Download the Regulations

Heather England
heather.england@tpwd.texas.gov
 512-389-4505
www.tpwd.state.tx.us

Updated: 01/30/2020

Utah

“Utah Code §§ 23-20-3, 23-20-12 & Utah Admin. Rule R657- 11-12 You may harvest all furbearers—except for bobcats and marten—by any legal means, excluding explosives and poisons. While hunting and trapping, you may not use the illegal spotlighting methods described on page 20. Bobcats may be taken only by shooting or trapping, or with the aid of dogs. Marten may be taken only with an elevated, covered set in which the maximum trap size shall not exceed 1½ foothold or 160 Conibear. Harvesting furbearers by shooting or with the aid of dogs is restricted to 30 minutes before sunrise to 30 minutes after sunset, unless you have a permit from the county to spotlight coyote, red fox, striped skunk or raccoon. For more information on spotlighting, see page 20.

Furbearers caught in a trapping device may be taken by shooting at any time.”

No restrictions listed in the Utah Furbearer Guidebook

“Spotlighting Utah Code §§§ 23-20-3, 76-10-504, 76-10-523 and Utah Admin. Rule R657-11-13 You may not use spotlighting to hunt or harvest protected wildlife. You may not use a spotlight, headlight or other artificial light to locate any protected wildlife while having in your possession a firearm or other weapon or device that could be used to take or injure protected wildlife. The use of a spotlight or other artificial light in any area where protected wildlife are generally found is considered probable cause of attempting to locate protected wildlife

Some counties allow spotlighting if a hunter is trying to harvest coyote, red fox, striped skunk or raccoon. See Utah Code § 23- 13-17 and your county laws and ordinances for more information. Even if your county’s laws do not permit spotlighting, you may still use spotlighting to hunt coyote, red fox, striped skunk or raccoon if you are one of the following individuals:

  • A landowner (or landowner’s agent) who is protecting crops or domestic animals from predation by those animals
  • A Wildlife Services agent, acting in an official capacity under a memorandum of understanding with the Division. The firearm restrictions in this section do not apply to concealed firearm permit holders, provided the person is not utilizing the concealed firearm to hunt or take wildlife.”

In Short:

Night hunting is not restricted by State regulations and is allowed in some counties only. The use of night vision and artificial light is also restricted by each county. Contact your local office for specific county laws.

» Download the Regulations

 801-538-4700
www.wildlife.utah.gov

Updated: 01/30/2020

Vermont

Hunting Hours:

  • Raccoon: Any hour within hunting season.
  • Coyote: Any hour, no lights allowed.

No restrictions listed in the Vermont Hunting & Trapping Guide.

“It is illegal to intentionally throw or cast the rays of a spotlight, jack, or other artificial light on any highway, or any field, woodland, or forest, in order to spot, locate, take, or attempt to spot, locate or take any wild animal. A light may be used to illuminate and shoot a raccoon once treed by a dog, or dogs, during the raccoon hunting season. A light may also be used to illuminate a raccoon once treed by a dog, or dogs, during the raccoon training season. Laser sights are illegal for hunting

In Short:

Raccoon and coyotes may be hunted at night. The use of artificial light is allowed for hunting raccoons once treed by a dog but are not allowed for coyote hunting. Laser sights are not allowed. The use of night vision equipment is not listed as a restriction and is therefore assumed as allowed.

» Download the Regulations

John Hall
john.hall@vermont.gov
 802-241-3700
www.vtfishandwildlife.com

Updated: 01/29/2020

Virginia

“Bobcats, foxes, raccoons, and opossums may be hunted by day or night during authorized seasons.”

“Nuisance species may be taken day or night.”

“Night vision scopes and laser sights may be used.”

“Lights may be used as long as the light is not attached to or cast from a vehicle.”

In Short:

Bobcats, foxes, raccoons, and opossums, as well as nuisance species may be hunted at night. Artificial light may be used, provided that it is not attached to or cast from a vehicle. Night vision scopes and laser sights are allowed.

» Download the Regulations

Vance Shearin
vance.shearin@dgif.virginia.gov
 804 367-1000
www.dgif.virginia.gov

Updated: 01/29/2020

Washington

“A small game license is required for hunting all small game, except forest grouse and coyotes which can be hunted with a big game or small game license. Small Game include:

  • Bobcat
  • Fox
  • Raccoon
  • Cottontail Rabbit and Snowshoe Hare
  • Forest Grouse
  • Crow
  • Coyote

Beaver, Badger, Weasels, Marten, Mink, Muskrat, and River Otter: May only be taken by trapping during the trapping season (Nov. 1 – Mar. 31)

Night Hunting for Bobcat is prohibited in the following GMUs that fall within the Lynx management zones: 101, 105, 111, 113, 117, 203, 204, 215, 218, 224, 233, 242 through 247, 250, 426 and 450.

It is unlawful to hunt bobcat and raccoon at night during modern firearm deer or elk general seasons that occur in October and November in eastern and western Washington.

Hound hunting:
The use of dogs to hunt black bear, bobcat, coyote, and cougar is prohibited year-round.
Dogs may be used to hunt raccoon, EXCEPT it is unlawful to hunt raccoons with dogs during modern firearm deer or elk general seasons that occur in October and November in eastern and western Washington.

Night hunting (WAC 220-413-060):
It is illegal to hunt wildlife at night during the months of October and November in any area open to modern firearm deer or elk hunting.”

Hunting big game with the aid of an artificial light, spotlight, or night vision equipment is prohibited. Night vision equipment includes electronic light amplification devices, thermal imaging devices, and other comparable equipment used to enhance night vision. Coyote may be hunted at night with lights year round, EXCEPT it is unlawful to hunt coyote at night during modern firearm deer or elk general seasons that occur in October and November in eastern and western Washington.

Hunting big game with the aid of an artificial light, spotlight, or night vision equipment is prohibited. Night vision equipment includes electronic light amplification devices, thermal imaging devices, and other comparable equipment used to enhance night vision. Coyote may be hunted at night with lights year round, EXCEPT it is unlawful to hunt coyote at night during modern firearm deer or elk general seasons that occur in October and November in eastern and western Washington.

In Short:

Night hunting of furbearers is allowed, but certain season restrictions apply. Night vision and artificial light may only be used when hunting coyote at night, except during deer and elk general seasons.

» Download the Regulations

wildthing@dfw.wa.gov
 360-902-2936
www.wdfw.wa.gov

Updated: 01/31/2020

West Virginia

It is illegal to:

“Use or attempt to use any artificial light or any night vision technology, including image intensification, thermal imaging or active illumination while hunting, locating, attracting, taking, killing or trapping wild birds or wild animals. However, artificial lights or night vision technology including image intensification, thermal imaging, or active illumination, may be used for taking coyote, fox, raccoon, skunk, and opossum. Coyotes and fox may be hunted using any color artificial light in open season (see pages 2 and 7).”

It is illegal to:

“Use or attempt to use any artificial light or any night vision technology, including image intensification, thermal imaging or active illumination while hunting, locating, attracting, taking, killing or trapping wild birds or wild animals. However, artificial lights or night vision technology including image intensification, thermal imaging, or active illumination, may be used for taking coyote, fox, raccoon, skunk, and opossum. Coyotes and fox may be hunted using any color artificial light in open season (see pages 2 and 7).”

It is illegal to:

“Use or attempt to use any artificial light or any night vision technology, including image intensification, thermal imaging or active illumination while hunting, locating, attracting, taking, killing or trapping wild birds or wild animals. However, artificial lights or night vision technology including image intensification, thermal imaging, or active illumination, may be used for taking coyote, fox, raccoon, skunk, and opossum. Coyotes and fox may be hunted using any color artificial light in open season (see pages 2 and 7).”

In Short:

Coyote, fox, raccoon, skunk, and opossum may be hunted at night with artificial light and night vision equipment during open seasons.

» Download the Regulations

wvdnrcustomerservice@wv.gov
 304-558-2771
www.wvdnr.gov

Updated: 01/30/2020

Wisconsin

“Unprotected species (as well as coyote, fox and raccoon) may be hunted without shooting hour restrictions except:

  • If hunting with a bow or crossbow, the hours listed on pages 31–32 apply for hunting all species* during the bear and archery deer seasons.
  • If hunting with a gun, the hours listed on pages 31–32 apply for hunting all species* during the regular 9-day November gun deer season. In the Southern Farmland Management Zone during this season, however, unprotected species may be hunted without shooting hour restrictions. This restriction does not apply, in any deer management zone or unit, during the 4-day antlerless deer season, youth deer hunt or muzzleloader season. See deer season dates on page 9. *Migratory game bird hunters should follow shooting hours given in 2019 Wisconsin Migratory Bird Regulations.”

“Unprotected species means mammals and birds that can be hunted year-round without bag limits or shooting hours restrictions, and includes starling, English (house) sparrow, chukar partridge, coturnix quail, opossum, skunk, weasel, woodchuck, porcupines and all other wild mammals not specifically mentioned in the hunting, trapping and migratory game bird regulation pamphlets and not listed as an endangered, threatened or protected species (see “protected species” listed above). A small game license is needed for hunting unprotected species”

“A flashlight or firearm-mounted light may be used at the point of kill while hunting on foot for coyote, raccoon, fox or unprotected species. Lights may not be used to shine for these animals while in possession of firearm, bow or crossbow.”

“A flashlight or firearm-mounted light may be used at the point of kill while hunting on foot for coyote, raccoon, fox or unprotected species. Lights may not be used to shine for these animals while in possession of firearm, bow or crossbow.”

In Short:

Unprotected species, as well as coyote, fox, and raccoon, may be hunted at night with certain season restrictions. According to the regulations, lights may not be used to shine for animals but can be used at the point of kill.

» Download the Regulations

Marilyn Howell
marilyn.howell@dnr.state.wi.us
 608-266-2621
www.dnr.state.wi.us

Updated: 02/06/2020

Wyoming

Predators may be taken with the aid of an artificial light or lighting device by:

(i) A public officer authorized to and conducting predator control;

(ii) A landowner, resident manager or person with the landowner’s or a resident manager’s written permission to take predators, on land under the landowner’s control for the protection of their property.

“Predatory animal” means coyote, jackrabbit, porcupine, raccoon, red fox, skunk or stray cat. “Predatory animal” also means gray wolf located outside the Wolf Trophy Game Management Area and Seasonal Wolf Trophy Game Management Area as described in W.S. § 23‐1‐101(a)(xii)(B) (l) and (ll).

No person shall take any wildlife with the aid of or by using any artificial light or lighting device except that predators may be taken with the aid of an artificial light or lighting device by:

(i) A public officer authorized to and conducting predator control;

(ii) A landowner, resident manager or person with the landowner’s or a resident manager’s written permission to take predators, on land under the landowner’s control for the protection of their property.

It is prima facie evidence of a violation if a person uses an artificial light in an area that may be inhabited by wildlife while having in their possession and control any device for taking wildlife. This shall not prohibit the hunting on foot of raccoon with the aid of a handlight, provided the hunter is accompanied by a raccoon hunting dog and, if hunting on private land(s), has the written permission of the landowner or their agent.

“Artificial light or lighting device” means any man‐made light or lighting device that projects a light visible to the unaided eye outside of the device, or any battery‐powered device that provides an enhanced ability to see in the dark

No person shall take any wildlife with the aid of or by using any artificial light or lighting device except that predators may be taken with the aid of an artificial light or lighting device by:

(i) A public officer authorized to and conducting predator control;

(ii) A landowner, resident manager or person with the landowner’s or a resident manager’s written permission to take predators, on land under the landowner’s control for the protection of their property.

It is prima facie evidence of a violation if a person uses an artificial light in an area that may be inhabited by wildlife while having in their possession and control any device for taking wildlife. This shall not prohibit the hunting on foot of raccoon with the aid of a handlight, provided the hunter is accompanied by a raccoon hunting dog and, if hunting on private land(s), has the written permission of the landowner or their agent.

“Artificial light or lighting device” means any man‐made light or lighting device that projects a light visible to the unaided eye outside of the device, or any battery‐powered device that provides an enhanced ability to see in the dark

In Short:

Predators (coyote, jackrabbit, porcupine, raccoon, red fox, skunk or stray cat) may be hunted at night on private lands only and the landowner’s permission is required. The use of night vision equipment and artificial light is allowed, when hunting predators on private land.

» Download the Regulations

 307-777-4600
www.wgfd.wyo.gov

Updated: 02/06/2020

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